The City of Man

I am sitting in the San Antonio airport, waiting for my flight back home, reflecting on an excellent Values and Capitalism retreat here and–the subject of this blog–my walk yesterday.  My goal was to walk to a bookstore about two miles from my downtown hotel.  I had mapped it out using Googlemaps and set out for what I thought would be about a 20 minute trip one way.  37 minutes later I realized I had gone too far and had… Continue Reading ››

George Washington University, American History and the “New Globalism”

I have written on this blog before about the importance of the liberal arts, but I now have an interesting negative example of how universities have been marginalizing not only the liberal arts but also American civilization in particular.  Let me begin with a quote from this article by Ian Tuttle in the National Review Online, dated December 29, 2016: “Recently, GW — a 25,000-student private university located in Washington, D.C.’s Foggy Bottom neighborhood — eliminated its American-history requirement for… Continue Reading ››

A Real-Life Story of Bureaucratic Dysfunction

If you want to read a classic insider narrative of the degeneration and dysfunction of a large and powerful (and unlimited) federal bureaucracy, read here: http://www.nationalreview.com/article/443227/consumer-financial-protection-bureau-tragic-failures.  The article chronicles the work of one highly placed lawyer in the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau  before it was slapped hard by the Federal courts. I have frequently written about what can and does occur when Constitutional limits are ignored.  This is all too frequent, given the propensity of Congress to simply give up its… Continue Reading ››

Bureaucracy and the New President

I was reading an interesting article in Reason today that directly addressed one of the major issues I have raised before and frequently alluded to (see http://reason.com/archives/2016/12/19/trump-versus-the-we-bes, December 20, 2016).  It has to do with the theme of “Trump versus the bureaucracy.”  One could substitute any president’s name in that slogan since the 1930s at least.  This is the crucial question: How does a president or his cabinet or his political appointees actually control the huge Federal agencies and make… Continue Reading ››

Are all sins the same?

And if not, are there any implications for us in a political economy blog?  Michael Kruger over at The Gospel Coalition asks the question of whether all sins are the same, and answers no.  He notes that both people who take sin serious and those that don’t can come to this conclusion.  For the person who takes sin serious, some Christians use this phrase to uphold the seriousness of sin. It is viewed as a way to remind people not to… Continue Reading ››

Ethics and Economics: A New Frontier in the Twenty-First Century

This blog is generally about current policies or issues in the news or that are still current to a degree in the realm of political economy, politics, and economics.  I have been reading a really interesting book by Jonathan Wight, entitled Ethics in Economics: An Introduction to Moral Frameworks (Stanford University Press, 2015).  Wight addresses in detail one of the hottest issues among economic thinkers–it has been pretty hot among political philosophers for centuries and was once current among those… Continue Reading ››

The Pernicious Income Inequality of Federal Employees

In an article from CNS News dated December 16, 2016, we have the new but predictable Census Bureau statistics on median income for households in counties of the United States.  The first four richest counties are, …, you guessed it, all in the Washington, DC area, and range from about $99,000 per year to $122, 000 per year (see http://www.census.gov/did/www/saipe/data/highlights/2015.html).  That is more that twice the United States Average of around $55,000.  Nine of the top twenty counties are in… Continue Reading ››

Trump’s Trumps

A new controversy–well, not really new, just renewed–has now taken the stage regarding President-Elect Donald Trump’s transition.  This one concerns the “flavor” of his cabinet choices, taken collectively.  The media and Democrats are trying to figure out (1) what they tell us about Trump and (2) what the supporter–stakeholders think about the choices.  Those are interesting questions.  I am not sure they can be answered adequately at this point, but let’s at least explore them. First, do the choices made… Continue Reading ››

Non-Fake Update on Fake News

This is getting a bit confusing.  Now we see fake news writers excoriating what they call fake news.  Moreover, we now have a battle of alleged fake news going.  In the past few days the allegation that Russia was hacking the Democratic National Committee website has been a major theme of the Left in DC.  Interesting that the original hacking had to do with John Podesta, not the DNC.  Now it is the DNC.  The Left claims support from the… Continue Reading ››

Trump and the “Bully” Pulpit

Donald J. Trump will soon ascend to the most powerful office in the history of the world. He is used to the worlds of business and show business, and his unfamiliarity with politics was his greatest qualification for many voters who desired change above all else. Trump, though, needs to transition between these worlds. He is no longer merely a billionaire with a tv show. There is more than a whiff of the monarchy between the lines of Article 2.… Continue Reading ››

Quote of the Week!

“The earliest church was seen as too exclusive and a threat to the social order because it would not honor all deities; today Christians are again being seen exclusive and a threat to the social order because we will not honor all identities.”  –Tim Keller